Barbecue Around The Globe

From Snow Peak by: Savanna Frimoth

Nearly every culture has its own method and approach to grilled or barbecued meat. It’s the perfect season to ditch your indoor kitchen in favor of some open-air cooking, so take a read to learn a little about three barbecue origins for some inspiration!  

KOREAN BULGOGI  

Korean bulgogi dates back to 37 BCE. The word bulgogi comes from the words “bul” meaning fire and “gogi” meaning meat. Bulgogi is typically the highest quality meat, often marinated for hours in a sweet and savory sauce before grilled on a barbecue or stovetop griddle. It’s commonly served with banchan or a variety of fermented side dishes. If you’re trying it yourself, we recommend using the Grill Burner in an IGT Four Unit Frame for a communal experience shared with friends.  

JAPANESE YAKITORI  

Originating in the Meiji period (1880s-90s) of Japan, yakitori translates to roasted bird. Fowl had become popular but was often expensive, so street vendors would use offcuts from restaurants. The skewers would then be barbecued and basted with a tare sauce. Yakitori is often grilled over binchotan charcoal, which can reach exceptionally high temperatures, quickly sealing the flavors. Try making yakitori for yourself using the Takibi Fire & Grill.  

AMERICAN-STYLE  

Barbecue in the United States varies by region. For instance, in Memphis, you might enjoy a barbecue sandwich with a sweet tomato-based sauce, while in Kansas City, you might have dry-rubbed ribs. North Carolina favors vinegar-based sauce, and Texas offers mesquite-grilled brisket. The origins of barbecue in the United States date back to colonial times, with roots in the Caribbean, where the indigenous peoples slow-cooked meat over an indirect flame. The Spanish colonizers referred to this method as barbacoa. Eventually, their methods were brought to the US, where they continued to evolve regionally for many decades. Whatever your preferred style, the Kojin Grill is the way to go!

Explore Snow Peak’s catalog of recipes for more outdoor cooking inspiration!  

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