SCOTT Scrapper 115 Ski | POWDER Skier’s Choice

 

A review of the SCOTT Scrapper 115 in the 2017 POWDER Buyer’s Guide

By Powder Magazine

Made to shred the cheese right out of the mountain, the Scott Scrapper, featuring Scott’s 3Dimensional Sidecut, works pretty much every day except for the truly icy and firm. A paulownia wood core runs the length of the ski between sheets of carbon and fiberglass. A titanal strip reinforces the binding mount. Steel edges top the construction off. “Awesome, super light ripper,” says Salt Lake City skier Spencer Harkins. “The Scott Scrapper can charge anything but still be fun and floaty.”

Details

Price: $600

Lengths: 182, 189cm

Dimensions: 142-115-131mm

Radius: 23m

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SCOTT S1 Boot Breaks the Mold

The following is from Crystal Sagan at POWDER

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SCOTT S1 Carbon Touring Ski Boot | POWDER Magazine

Forget what you thought you knew about touring boots

 

The POWDER staff attended SIA in Denver last week—the snow sports industry’s biggest trade show, where they are got a first look at the best gear for skiers.

Most touring boots follow the same basic mold—tech fittings on the toe, some variety of rubber sole, ski/walk mode on the calf. SCOTT goes against the grain with the S1 Carbon, the pièce de résistance of its 17/18 touring line, putting the ski/walk mode in the front of the boot, where the forefoot meets the shin. Combined with carbon fiber, the front placement of the ski/walk mode makes for an uber-stiff touring boot (130 flex) without the need of a carbon tongue. This new technology does come at a price, so start saving your pennies now—the 130 flex version will retail for $999.99.

 

Stay tuned for more on the 17.18 line from SCOTT.

 

CamelBak Gear Review: Franconia LR 24 Hydration Pack

From the CO-OP Journal
By Matt & Agnes Hage

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As I pulled CamelBak’s new hydration daypack out of the box, my first impression was “Wow, this thing is hefty.” The Franconia LR 24 is both a daypack and a hydration pack, but it’s the Cadillac of those categories. It’s full of features found on most big backpacking rigs, such as load lifters on the shoulder straps, a generous hipbelt with expandable pockets, and compression straps to bring the load closer into your back. And, it has a metal frame. All of these give it the ability to comfortably carry a good-sized load, and with over 20 liters of capacity, that’s a real option.

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In addition to what I normally carry for a day hike in the mountains (snacks, layers, jacket, water), I was able to put a DSLR camera with a couple lenses in the pack body along with a couple cans of beer to fill it out properly. There still was room for a sandwich and an apple. With the three-liter water reservoir filled to capacity, my daypack weighed about 28 pounds—all of which would cut straight into my shoulders with a classic “bag with two straps” kind of pack. But trying on the Franconia, fully loaded for a posh day hike, I could feel how the solidly built frame worked with the load lifters, hipbelt and compression straps to provide a smooth carry. This proved to be the case on a couple peak-bagging missions in the mountains near our home in Anchorage, Alaska.

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Scrambling up craggy ridgelines, I appreciated how the pack is designed to pull the weight into my back. The side compression straps for the internal reservoir pocket securely put those three liters squarely up against the lumbar area of the back instead of higher up in-between my shoulder blades.

The pack’s air suspension back panel was also one of my favorite features, since hiking a good-sized load up a couple thousand feet of mountain can be sweaty work. Even though I did break a sweat, the back of my shirt didn’t get the soaked feel you can get with limited-airflow back panels. Lastly, the hipbelt tightened easily and both cargo pockets were easy to access while tight on your hips.

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CamelBak’s latest incarnation of their signature hydration reservoir, the Crux LR, is topnotch. I’ve shied away from CamelBak hydration systems after years of wonky screw-on lids that often went on half-cocked only to leak two liters of water into my pack. Those days seem to be behind us now: Filling and tightening the new Crux LR is easy and secure.

The Franconia is more like a mini full-featured backpack than a daypack or hydration pack. Because its empty weight of nearly three pounds would easily eclipse the payload, you wouldn’t want this for a trail run or if all you carry is a jacket and a couple energy bars. But its awesome carrying capacity does make it a good choice for day outings (bring a cooking system for hot drinks or dinner on top of some peak) as well as minimalist overnighters (we’ve done three days out of 25-liter packs).

SCOTT Cosmos II AT Boot Review

By Phul Lindeman from Summitdaily.com

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Scott Cosmos II

MSRP: $749.99

Sizes: Men’s U.S. 4-14

Weight: 3.15 pounds in size 8.5

Shell material: Powerlite shell made with Grilamid thermoplastic outer and four aluminum buckles

Liner material: Italian-made Powerlite ski mountaineering liner, with ventilated mesh through the ankle and memory foam padding on the footbed

Other features: Vibrman high-density rubber outsole for grip when hiking; shock-dampening footbed inserts; adjustable spoiler for forward lean; lock catches on buckles for touring mode.

 

 

 

 

 

High Gear: Scott Cosmos II men’s AT boot (review)

Now I know how ski patrollers can spend 10-plus hours in ski boots and still love what they do, season after season after season.

For years and years — since the first time I went skiing at 4 or 5 years old — I’ve only set foot to snow in a pair of alpine ski boots. Come to think of it, those dastardly death traps are one of the major reasons I switched over to snowboarding as a teenager. I figured: Why deal with buckle-up Plastic Maidens when the other, cooler sport comes with boots as comfortable as skate shoes?

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Then I met the Scott Cosmos II ($599). It was love at first fit — that’s saying a lot for a snowboarder — and I suddenly understood why the majority of patrollers wear AT boots instead of alpine models. The updated Cosmos is a men’s AT boot made for the everyman of the mountains: the sort of guy who goes for a lunchtime skin one day, an eight-hour trek the next and then spends the next four days working in the snow. It was my introduction to the wonderful world of ski boots made for, well, human feet, not nerveless masses of bruised meat. (So I’m late to the party, whatever.)

This combination of comfort, style and affordability is no mistake. The Cosmos II is basically a new-and-improved version of the men’s AT boot from Garmont, a boutique footwear manufacturer based in Italy. Scott bought the company’s ski division about four or five years ago, right when the AT scene started to explode and has been making small improvements on the sleek and sexy design ever since. I never wore the original model, but, from what I’ve heard, the merger was for the best: Garmont brought the know-how and Scott brought the price point.

“This really upped Scott’s game in the backcountry,” said Clay Schwarck, buyer and manager at Wilderness Sports in Dillon. “Now they’re making skis, backpacks, all the gear you need, and they made the move at the right time when AT was exploding. I think they’ve done it right.”

But, like any tale of love at first sight, I had to spend at least a week or two with the boots before I knew if it was true love or just lust. The boots are comfortable out of the box, but are they still comfortable after a full day of skinning? Even my Thirty-Two JP Walker’s have nasty hot spots after long enough. And, when it’s time to rip powder on the descent, is the Cosmos II powerful and responsive or cheap and floppy?

First date: a day on Mount Baldy.

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Yakima SkyRise

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Yakima SkyRise

The first rooftop tent from Yakima

Lightweight, easy to install, and mega-comfortable in all types of weather, the Yakima SkyRise Rooftop Tent is on its way. Coming in two sizes for an ideal fit on small or larger vehicles, the SkyRise features a big skylight for clear night star viewing, and a DWR coated rainfly for less ideal conditions.

COMING IN EARLY 2017

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CAMPING, FESTIVALS OR ANY WEEKEND ROADTRIP

With universal mounting hardware and a super-comfy foam pad, the SkyRise is ready to roll to any roadtrip destination. And because it’s from Yakima, you will know your fit is secure, even on small vehicles.

 

 

SETS-UP AND BREAKS DOWN IN MINUTES

Don’t waste your vacation time setting up camp – pitch your tent in seconds and get back to the fun part. We bet you’ve never broken camp this fast before.

 

CamelBak Gear Review: Women’s Sundowner LR 22 Hydration Pack

From the CO-OP Journal
By Matt & Agnes Hage

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Do you ever wish that your daypack carried as well as your full-size pack? So many small packs (less than 25 liters) are little more than glorified rucksacks: a bag with two shoulder straps. Sometimes that’s all you need, but the simplicity is quickly trumped by necessity once you start adding anything of significant weight, such as water. Without compression straps, your load is literally slumped in a pile in a sack on your back. And without a frame or sturdy hipbelt, every ounce of that pile is going straight to your shoulders. My favorite aspects of CamelBak’s new women-specific Sundowner address both of those issues.

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This 22-liter hydration pack will carry everything you need for a full day out in the hills, whether you’re trail hiking, scrambling to the top of craggy peaks or riding a mountain bike. It comes with CamelBak’s new Crux LR reservoir with capacity for three liters (100 ounces) of water. That’s potential for packing some pounds—6.5 pounds, in fact—and the Sundowner is ready to handle it.

Designed with a metal frame, the pack transfers weight from your shoulders to your hips where you want it. What’s more, the Sundowner features a special reservoir pocket right behind the lumbar area of the hipbelt with side compression straps that cinch the reservoir up against your lower back. This helps keep your center of gravity low and also helps takes strain off your shoulders.

The last piece of this load-management puzzle is the load lifters on the shoulder straps. I use them all the time on my full-size pack to take pressure off my shoulders, so it’s nice to see them on a smaller frame pack.

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As you’d expect from CamelBak, the pack’s hydration system is topnotch. The hose runs cleanly out from the reservoir and down the shoulder strap. It’s capped with their signature locking bite valve. A unique magnetic tube trap on the shoulder strap keeps the hose accessible while you hike. I found it easier to use and more secure than some other magnetic hose-keepers on the market.

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The three-liter reservoir and hose also get their own external access compartment in the pack. For your gear, there are plenty of pockets that keep smaller items from settling to the bottom of your load. My favorites are the rear stuff-it pocket for quick access to my wind jacket and the two hipbelt pockets for snacks or a small camera.

Overall I found the Sundowner to be better than most daypacks on the market today. It’s a useful size at 22 liters—not too big and not too small. Heck, we’ve done overnighters with 25-liter packs and a minimalist kit. The construction appears well done and it should stand up to years of use. The Sundowner is a versatile option for those that want a do-it-all daypack. While trail running and rock climbing wouldn’t be a good fit for this pack, in my opinion, due to the metal frame and bulk, that’s not a dig on the Sundowner, as both of those sports require a certain fit and feature set.

GoPro Hero5 Black review

By Luke Johnson
From Wearable.com

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GoPro HERO5 Review

The best action camera ever made. Period.

GoPro is to action cams what the iPad is to tablets and Google Glass to ideas that never caught on. Not only did GoPro practically invent the sector, it has dominated it since day one. Since the GoPro Hero4+ launched a couple of years ago though, the company has faced falling sales and renewed competition, with the likes of the TomTom Bandit and Drift Stealth 2 bringing the fight to the action cam specialist.

The new Hero5 Black is GoPro’s comeback charge. It’s a camera that builds on the firm’s strong foundations with all the additional features users have been calling out for.

From integrated GPS to inbuilt video stabilization and the arrival of a 2-inch touch screen display, this rugged 4K action cam is all change. Is this enough to get you upgrading though? We put it to the test to find out.

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